Arizona Senior Law Blog

How to Secure Disabled Child’s Future

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: I have an adult son with a disability.  He lives on his own, but I have supported him financially for most of his life.  I currently live in an independent living community, but there could be a time at which I transition to assisted living.  If this happens, I can see myself quickly depleting my resources.  Is there any way in which I can provide my son with some of my resources, and

ALTCS Enforces Travel Limitations

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: My husband and I live in Arizona, but most of our family lives out-of-state.  Like many other couples of our age, we like to spend our summers in cooler climates, so we typically stay with our son, who lives in another state, for about four months of the year.  If I apply for the ALTCS program, will ALTCS have any problems with me maintaining this type of a travel schedule? I should preface

Intersection on VA and ALTCS Planning

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: About two years ago, a financial advisor helped my parents devise a plan by which my dad, a veteran, could qualify for VA Pension.  This plan involved funding an annuity and establishing a trust.  The VA Pension now provides my parents with additional monthly income of about $2,000, but they are still having difficulty paying for dad’s care.  I looked into the ALTCS benefit, but discovered that the type of VA planning in

ALTCS Qualification With Business Assets

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: I have operated a family business for most of my life.  While things have slowed down now that I am approaching retirement, I still work about 30 hours a week.  My wife has dementia and I think she could benefit from the ALTCS program.  Outside of the business we have meager resources, but my concern is that my business will prevent her from qualifying.  Can you shed some light on this, perhaps? In

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: I read in a recent article that ALTCS imposes a penalty period, during which time it will not pay for care, for uncompensated transfers occurring in the five years preceding an ALTCS application.  Your article further expressed that the penalty period begins running when the applicant is “otherwise eligible.” Can you elaborate on this?  I ask because my mom gave me $50,000 last year, and we are now considering applying for ALTCS. The

CSMIA- New Eligibility limit for 2014

Conceptually speaking, ALTCS members must pay what they are able towards their cost of care. This amount is referred to as the “share of cost.” For single ALTCS members residing in a facility, the share of cost typically amounts to the member’s total monthly income, less a personal needs allowance and the cost of health insurance premiums. Married applicants, on the other hand, utilize a formula that provides for a spousal allowance designed to protect well-spouses from impoverishment. This allowance is referred to as the Community Spouse Minimum Income Allowance (CSMIA). Effective July 1, 2014, the CSMIA increased to $1,967.

Breaking Down the Affordable Care Act

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: I keep reading about how Governor Brewer is at odds with state legislators because she helped expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.  However, I also read that Arizona did not create a health insurance exchange, which I thought was fundamental to the Affordable Care Act.  Can you help me make sense of this? The Affordable Care Act is a very large piece of legislation with multiple goals, including expanding insurance coverage and

When to start planning for ALTCS

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: A couple of weeks ago, my father suffered a fairly severe stroke.  After a brief hospitalization, he was transferred to a skilled nursing facility for rehabilitation.  He is making strides in his therapy, but we don’t know if he will fully recover.  Without this knowledge, how can I determine when to prepare for the ALTCS program? I am assuming that your father’s care is currently covered by Medicare.  By design, however, Medicare covers

Expansion of Medicaid

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q:  I have read about Governor Brewer’s decision to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.  I understand that state legislators are trying to bring a lawsuit in an effort to undo Arizona’s expansion of Medicaid.  Can you explain what would happen if Arizona did not expand Medicaid? The Affordable Care Act was not drafted to give states an option as to whether they would expand Medicaid.  Rather, after a challenge to the law,

ALTCS and Small Money Transfers

Our latest Arizona Republic article in the weekly Aging and the Law column can be found below. Our column runs every Friday in select Arizona cities. Q: Over the last several years, my wife and I have given our children various gifts, totaling about $20,000.  Due to health concerns, we recently decided to move my wife to an assisted living community, where she can receive the care that she deserves.  I have done a little reading about the ALTCS program, and I am afraid that the gifts we have given will give ALTCS cause to refuse coverage to my wife. 

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